George "Bud" Scholl has listed his 6,000 square foot Florida residence for $13.9 million, according to the Kleer & Garcia-Diaz listing. The former Sunny Isles mayor's home has seven bedrooms, six full bathrooms, and one-half bathroom. The real appeal of the Spanish-style mansion is the direct waterfront location. The home is directly against the southwest portion of the Atlantic Isle. It also comes with a private island, though New York Post noted that the 1.5-acre landmass is only fit for sustaining mangrove trees and is not buildable.

Located less than an hour north of Miami, the waterfront mansion is also rich in history. While the home's property tax records list that construction began in the 1930s, it was actually built in 1928, leading to the belief it may have been a place for illegal gambling and storing alcohol during Prohibition. Furthermore, it's suspected those involved were associates of Al Capone.

Waterfront Spanish colonial beauty

The Florida mansion has access to a private island which, while not buildable, is a gorgeous display of the native foliage the state has to offer. New York Post said the distance between the home and the island is swimmable and can also be canoed. Across the water is also Oleta River State Park, which offers over 1,000 square feet of beautiful, tropical nature. It also provides lots of privacy for the property.

No need to worry about boat storage, either. The home has a boat garage on the water and is accessible from inside the house, meaning you won't have to drag the boat from land to water. There is also a lift, meaning you can work on your boat sheltered from the sun and then simply lower it back into the water.

The home itself is built in an early 20th-century Spanish style, with orange-red stucco walls, barrel roof tile, Spanish colonial windows, and tall arches. There is also plenty of outdoor recreational space and patios, perfect for basking in the gorgeous weather, observing the water and surrounding nature, watching the sunset, etc.

A mix of old and new

While the waterfront location is the major appeal of this home, the interior is also stunning. It is a mix of classic, Spanish, and Art Deco. The living room, for example, has classic windows and glass French doors, a slightly Spanish-influenced wallpaper and fireplace, and an Art Deco fire screen and wood floor.

The attached dining room, however, has a darker, more antique look. There is half wall paneling with warm, dark wood and wallpaper, very much influenced by its 1928 build date. Lighter chevron-patterned wood floors the room. There is patio access against one wall, the glass-paned doors letting in natural light into the otherwise dark room. Across from the door is a built-in bar and china cabinet. A large, red statement light pendant hangs in the center of the room, as well as gold sconces on the walls, helping light the room and further providing an Art Deco influence.

Floridian luxury and comfort

The kitchen is also a stunning feature of the southwest Florida home. The floors are a warm, shiny wide-planked wood, and the walls are made mostly of cabinets where there aren't counters, with a granite backsplash where there are. A large island sits in the middle of the room, with a sleek wood top and lovely navy blue base with intricate carvings. A sink with a vintage-style commercial faucet sits in the middle, across from a double range gas top stove with a pot filler faucet. There is also another large, deep basin sink and a door leading outside.

On the right side of the room is a large fridge. To the other side of the room are two stacked stainless steel stoves. An attached "keeping room" sits next to the stoves, offering more storage (though the kitchen itself provides more than enough), yet another sink, room for more kitchen appliances, and alcohol storage — perhaps an homage to the home's illicit history.